Churches

Murraysburg organ still makes a joyful noise!

The first organ of the Murraysburg Dutch Reformed Church was inaugurated on July 7, 1871. The organist was W P de Villiers from Beaufort West, who regularly played until Miss J P Herholdt was appointed as organist in January 1872, at a salary of £25 a year. She held this position until she married B […]

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Nepotism In The Church?

In November, 1854, nepotism was questioned in the Dutch Reformed Church. Someone, using the nom-de-plume En Clique Tegenstaander, en Tegenstreever, wrote to the editor of the S A Commercial Advertiser and Cape Town Mail, on November 2, saying: I have been informed that it is contrary to the discipline of the Hollandische Gereformeerde Kerk in […]

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Praising the Lord – The Anglican way

Getting the word of the Lord to the far flung corners of the hinterland was a daunting task in the early 1800s. Scottish clergy arrived to preach to Dutch farmers of the interior, but a true Anglican service was a rarity and, when these services were held, they scared the locals! This is according to […]

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Rev Colin Fraser’s marriage

When Beaufort West’s Dutch Reformed Church minister Colin Fraser heard of Anna Amalia Muller’s conversion, during a service conducted by Ds Abraham Faure in Graaff Reinet, he was immensely impressed. He instantly wrote her a letter proposing marriage. She replied: “Unknown is unloved. It is impossible for me to consider a marriage proposal from someone […]

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Rev Colin Fraser’s rural ministry

Colin Fraser, a Scot, came to serve the Dutch Reformed congregation in Beaufort West as a minister in 1825. He had some incredible experiences in the Karoo and many of these are written up in a biography, Episodes in my Life, written by his son John. When he arrived in Beaufort West, no real house, […]

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Rev Colin Fraser’s spirited leadership in Beaufort West

The early churches in South Africa were not free to appoint their ministers. These men were appointed by the State. There was also no free election of church councillors – names of men willing to serve had to be submitted to the magistrates of the little villages at the end of each year and these […]

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Rev Taylor and the rise and fall of the Cradock Congregational Church

As a result of a London Missionary Society outreach programme, a congregational church was started in Cradock in 1820.  Rev George Baker, who was born in Essex in 1789 and who had come to South Africa in 1815 to serve as a missionary with the LMS, moved to Cradock as the town’s first preacher in […]

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The Dutch Reformed Church in Cradock

According to local lore the Dutch Reformed Church in Cradock is rooted in a love story. Legend has it that this beautiful church, a copy of St Martin’s-in-the-Field, in London, was created by the local dominee for his wife, the love of his life. Apparently she was English and pined for her homeland. He loved […]

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