The Built Environment

Revalidating vernacular techniques for a sustainable built environment by way of selected examples in the Eastern Cape

Steenkamp, C (2012), Revalidating vernacular techniques for a sustainable built environment by way of selected examples in the Eastern Cape, Masters in Architecture thesis, University of the Free State.   Abstract Hassan Fathy, an Egyptian architect, held that architects are in a unique position to revive people’s faith in their own culture, and if, as […]

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Shale Gas Development in the Central Karoo – Impacts on infrastructure and spatial planning

Shale gas development (SGD) is expected to have the following impacts: • Highly likely to be an incremental increase in the construction, upgrading and maintenance of road infrastructure with an associated increase in demand for scarce construction materials (including high quality gravel and water) and increased on-going road maintenance. • Highly likely to be increased […]

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Sosio-ekonomiese ontwikkeling van die landdrosdistrikte Bethulie en Philippolis 1965

No e-book appears to be available, but it should be available on interlibrary loan, from the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein. Prof Doreen Atkinson may be able to access this item for you electronically; contact her at karoo@intekom.co.za

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The Benefits of Applying Vernacular Indigenous Building Techniques in Human Settlements

Steenkamp, C & Whitfield, KP (2012), The Benefits of Applying Vernacular Indigenous Building Techniques in Human Settlements: The Case of uMasizakhe Township, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape,. Human Settlements Review, Vol. 2. No 2   Abstract  The South African government has embarked on providing housing for the country‟s poor and underprivileged populace through the Reconstruction and Development […]

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The Cape Midlands:

The area covered in this survey of the Cape Midlands is roughly that portion of the Eastern Cape Province which looks to Port Elizabeth as its principal industrial and market centre where the density of the population is the closest. It lies generally within the geographical region described by Professor J.V.L. Rennie as the Eastern […]

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The devil is in the detail: An analysis of the DBSA’s ‘Access to Sanitation’ indicator

Ingle, M (2009), The devil is in the detail: An analysis of the DBSA’s ‘Access to Sanitation’ indicator, The Journal of Transdisciplinary Research in Southern Africa, 5(2) 217-229. Abstract When using indicator values to measure change over an interval of time, the general understanding of the factor being analysed may have been modified during the […]

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The enterprise ecology of towns in the Karoo, South Africa

 Two concepts, (1) companies are ‘living’ entities and (2) ‘company ecology’, stimulated our hypothesis that towns are ‘enterprise ecosystems’. This hypothesis cannot be tested directly. However, if it is correct, application of clustering and ordination techniques used frequently in studies of natural ecosystems, should reveal clusters of towns that are statistically significantly different (p < […]

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The origin of towns in the Eastern Cape midlands

IN this study the Eastern Cape Midlands are defined as that “,rea including most of the upper and middle sections in the drainage basins of the Sundays and Great Fish rivers, the southern boundary being taken as the Klein Winterberg and Suurberg ranges. This region consists of the magisterial districts of Murraysburg, Aberdeen, Graaff-Reinet, Jansenville, […]

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Thinking regionally: Aviation and development implications in the Karoo region

This study focuses on regional economic development in South Africa, across provincial political jurisdictions. The article argues that remote hinterlands can be more usefully understood as forming an integrated whole, rather than functioning as the poor rural cousins of their provincial metropoles. This article considers three propositions: that key transport projects (such as airports) may […]

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